Phase 1 – Design Challenge

Minumum Viable Product (MVP)

Description

Cubes

Following the principles of a Lean Startup a viable product is to be designed for testing at minimum costs and effort. The resulting Minimum Viable Product (MVP) should only have absolutely necessary functions. Any kind of features that are not essential to the products main functions are to be postponed. After creating a MVP it can be used for direct customer feedback at an early stage. Consequently, changes can be made early avoiding high costs, duplication of work and demotivation of the team. In this way the MVP allows an agile and efficient designing and testing.

 

Main purpose: Improving the product with customer feedback

Level of difficulty: Medium

Duration: 60 – 240 minutes

Means of use: Analog + Digital

Required material – for physical prototypes: Building blocks, Modelling clay, cardboard and glue, Styrofoam, etc.
Required material – for digital prototypes: Digital environment that allows for customer tests

Mainly used in phase: Test

 

Steps:

1

Take your current prototype and check whether the conditions of an MVP are already given: Does the product contain all functions required to fulfill it’s main purpose? If not, improve the prototype by adding functions.

Is the product built in the simplest way possible? Are all functions required in order to fulfill it’s main purpose? If not, simplify the product by removing optional features.

2

Once you have your MVP have it tested by your future customers. Let them try your product and let them give feedback. Ask how the perfect product would look like to them. Try to ask potential customers of diffierent customer segments in order to get a comprehensive feedback.

3

Analyse the feedback received and define it’s main aspects. What changes have most customers wished for? What has to be changed in the product.

4

Improve your product and repeat the steps with your new MVP until you are satisfied with the result.

Posted by J M in Phase 1 - Design Challenge, Phase 6 - Prototype, Phase 7 - Test, 0 comments

Brainstorming

Description

Brainstorming

When starting a creative process a wide range of ideas should be gathered. In this way the field of possible solution expands likewise. In order to lead to an optimal outcome in a group discussion this process should be done by following the Brainstorming rules.

The variation of Brainstorming where each team member works independently on the same problem by writing down solutions is called Brainwriting.

 

Main purpose: Generate new ideas in a group

Level of difficulty: Easy

Duration: 15 – 60 minutes

Means of use: Analog + Digital

Required material: Pen and paper

Mainly used in phase: Ideate

 

Steps:

1

Decide on a question or problem for which solution proposals shall be gathered by the team.

2

Set a time for the first round of ideation and choose a person to write down a protocol of the ideas.

3

Have each member of the team agree on the following brainstorming rules:

  • There are no wrong answers in brainstorming
  • Encourage wild and exaggerated ideas
  • Quantity before quality
  • Build on ideas put forward by others
  • Respect everybody and his ideas

4

Start an open discussion on a topic in which each person may add ideas.

5

Once the time is up, discuss the protocol and select ideas for further consideration.

 

Posted by J M in Phase 1 - Design Challenge, Phase 4 - Define Point of View, Phase 5 - Ideate, Phase 6 - Prototype, 0 comments

How Might We (HMW)

Description

Thought cloud

By phrasing problems as questions, solutions can be reached in a step by step process. This principle may be used in the beginning of a design thinking process in order to find the challenge of the project design. On the other hand it could be used in a later section to get ideas for prototyping.

 

Main purpose: Determine the project target OR find prototypes

Level of difficulty: Easy

Duration: 15 – 60 minutes

Means of use: Analog + Digital

Required material: Pen and paper

Mainly used in phase: Determine Design Challenge, Prototype

 

Steps:

1

Look at your current insight statements or knowledge base and identify the main problem or challenge. Try phrasing out the problem by using the term “How might we” at the beginning. For example in an early stage “How might we find a solution for expensive personal transportation?” Or in the prototyping phase “How might we build a car with only three wheels?”

2

The aim is to find new ways to approach a problem asking yourself what might be required to do. Repeat asking yourself completely new or related how might we questions in order to widen your circle of ideas. Do so until you have a couple of How Might We questions (HMW-Questions).

3

Check whether each question allows to generate a variety of specific solutions. If you can’t find a solution, try to reassemble or widen your question. If the question is to vague work out a more concrete one. The HMW-Questions will be the basis for further ideation – for example by brainstorming.

Posted by J M in Phase 1 - Design Challenge, Phase 6 - Prototype, 1 comment