Phase 2 – Understand

SWOT-Analysis

Description

SWOT Analysis is the short form of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats and is used for strategic planning. It is used to determ and understand the current state of an Organisation or project.

 

Main purpose: Determination of the current state

Level of difficulty: Moderate

Duration: Depends on the size of the project or Organisation

Means of use: Analog + Digital

Required material: Pen and paper, SWOT-Analysis template,                                                                                         Download SWOT-Analysis template here by nesta (or you can draw it on your own)

Mainly used in phase: Define Point of View

 

Steps:

1

Fill out every quadrant in the worksheet which includes the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats for your Organisation or project. Be self-critical and include all details.

2

Compare the different quadrants with each other.

  • Comparison of Chances and Strengths: Finding new opportunities that are comparable to the strengths of the Organisation or Product.
  • Comparison of Chances and Weaknesses: Eliminate weaknesses and try to find new opportunities. Transform risks into opportunities.
  • Comparison of Threats and Strengths: Use strengths to eliminate risks or dangers.
  • Comparison of Threats and Weaknesses: Develop strategies to prevent existing threats from becoming a threat.
Posted by tim in Phase 2 - Understand, Phase 4 - Define Point of View, 0 comments

Bodystorming

Description

Bodystorming is a creative method that uses the human body and the spatial environment for the design process. In addition to brainstorming, the method primarily aims for immediate testing. The idea generation process can be enormously enriched qualitatively and quantitatively.

An existing problem should be solved playfully and experimentally. A group of people playfully enter a readjusted scene for which an artifact or technical solution is to be developed. In this way, the necessary properties of the future solution should be better understood.

 

Main purpose: Generate and test new ideas in a group

Level of difficulty: Easy

Duration: 20-60 minutes

Means of use: Analog

Required material: Large cards, pen

Mainly used in phase: Ideate, Test

 

Steps:

1

Starting with a preliminary observation and documentation where interesting phenomena are selected and edited into readable design questions. A design question should represent the phenomenon as experiences, practices of the user or a problem in the events.

2

Chose a location wich is resemble or similar enough to the original environment.

3

Chose groups of four to eight people. Everyone needs to have a role, technical functions, systems or equipments. Role allocation can be done by creating props, including large cards that identify roles. Create thought-bubble cards wich include thoughts vs. saying or doing.

4

Have a narrator who explains things to participants. The narrator is able to pretend it is like a TV show and he can use a controller to stop play, rewind, or fast-forward.

5

Let the group work through its presentation. Try to approach the team with some improvisation help like “Yes, and…”.

6

Perform some skits showing a before and after service scenario.

7

Based on the discussion, let the group write down ideas as scenarios, depicting the user, a problem and solution to problem in a story-like format.

 

 


Posted by tim in Phase 2 - Understand, Phase 3 - Observe, Phase 5 - Ideate, Phase 7 - Test, 0 comments

Future Mapping

Description

Future mapping is used to create a shared view of trends in the recent past, present and future. This method involves a map with six areas to create an action scenario to achieve your goals. It is to identify patterns and to discuss the relevance of different trends. Mostly, it is used to support discussion and debate about high-level themes.

 

Main purpose: Identify and discuss industry trends

Level of difficulty: Moderate

Duration: 30-60 minutes

Means of use: Analog

Required material: Long empty wall, marker, post-its

Mainly used in phase: Understand

 

Steps:

1

Split the empty wall in 5 equal sections with a marker or with tape. At the top of each section, write down: the last year, the current year and the next years up to three years in the future.

2

Group standing faced to the wall. The group leader needs to give the participants following instructions:

We will, as a group, co-create a vision of the future through the lens of the past and the present.

The participants now shall write significant forces (behavioural, technologies, trends, etc.) on the post-its (one per post-it). After writing down a force, the participant has to go to the wall, reading out the written post-it and place it on the wall.

The focus is on filling the wall within 15 minutes and aiming for lots of different driving forces.

3

Now we have to fill the timeline with the written post-its. Starting with the last year, the participants have to fill the space with the written post-its within 3 minutes. After the time is up, move to the current year and let the participants do the same. The same goes with the following three years.

It is important everyone is participating. If the speed is dragging, the group leader has to make suggestions to inspire the group.

4

After the time is up, the group have to stay in front of the wall. The group have to look at the post-its on the wall and search for patterns and common themes in each year.

It is also possible to create subgroups which have about 10 minutes to sort the trends under each year and write down a summary of key words or patterns.

5

The participants have to reflect and discuss everything as a group. The group leader has to ask some questions like “What patterns do we see looking at this timeline?”, which makes the group discuss about it.

6

Finish the session by reflecting some of the key themes. The participants can tell how they would like to capture their thoughts and actions to use in the future.

 

Posted by tim in Phase 2 - Understand, 0 comments

Persona

Description

Persona-IconPersonas are fictional profiles, which respresent a group of people with similar personality and personal attributes. In marketing and other disciplines like user experience design, personas are widely used to represent customer segments and simplify working with them. A persona usually has a name, a picture, an age, a profession, an average income, a goal, behavioural traits and similar additional attributes.

Personas should help you develop empathy for your users and customers. They encourage you to embrace a user-centred approach.

 

Main purpose: Understand who you typical customer is

Level of difficulty: Easy

Duration: 15 – 60 minutes

Means of use: Analog + Digital

Required material: Persona Template or blank sheet, pen and paper
Download persona template here by Orangebus

Mainly used in Phase: Define Point of View

 

Steps:

1

List all customer segments in an overview. The customer segments should already have be identified in order to use the Persona-Method.

2

Print out a few persona templates, for example three or five – depending on the variety of customer types.

3

Analyse the customer segments in order to identify the three (or five) most important ones to your offered product or service and fill in a persona template for each one.

4

Have a look at the personas and check whether there are substantial parallels between them. If there are, try to combine the respective personas into one in order to reduce the number of different personas until no further reduction is possible.

5

Choose the most important of the remaining personas for your future work like for example with a Customer Journay Map.

Posted by J M in Phase 2 - Understand, Phase 4 - Define Point of View, 1 comment

Roadmap

Calendar Icon

Description

The Roadmap is a tool to implement your ideas. It helps defining the key stakeholders and milestones of your project. Main tasks and responsabilities are defined as well as the total project time line.

 

Main purpose: Plan implementation of the idea

Level of difficulty: Moderate

Duration: 30– 60 minutes

Means of use: Analog

Required material: Large canvas or calender, post-its or pins and papers, pen or markers

Mainly used in phase: Business Modell

 

Steps:

1

Gather your design team as well as all stakeholders that you can get hold of. By including these additional parties new perspectives and ideas can be brought to light.

2

Use a large canvas or even better a printed calender sheet for the next 18 month or your expected project duration. Your expected duration should include some additional time as a buffer. Use pins or post-its to mark important events and key milestones of the project.
Assign a member of the team to keep track of the progress.

3

In efficiently edit the calendar in parts: Ask yourself questions like, what needs to happen in the next month or quarter? Start with working out on the according time frame.

4

Highlight the main milestones with another colour than the remaining entries. When selecting the main milestones, think about what events could delay the project’s downtime.

5

Assign one team member to each key milestone in order to control the progress.

Posted by J M in Phase 2 - Understand, Phase 8 - Build Business Model, 0 comments

Define Your Audience

Description

Audience

Before you dig into your in-context research, it’s critical to know who you’re designing it for. You’re bound to learn more once you’re in the field, but having an idea of your target audience’s needs, contexts, and history will help ensure that you start your research by asking smart questions. Don’t limit your thinking just to the people you’re designing it for. You may need to consider governments, NGOs, other businesses, or competitors.

 

Main purpose: Define clients and remaining Stakeholders

Level of difficulty: Easy

Duration: 20 – 40 minutes

Means of use: Analog or digitally

Required material: post-its, pen, large empty wall

Mainly used in phase: Understand

 

Steps:

1

With your team, write down all the people or groups that are directly involved in or reached by your challenge. Are you designing for children? For farmers? Write down all the groups on post-its and pin them on a wall so you can visualize your audience.

2

Add people or groups who are peripherally relevant, or associated with your direct audience.

3

Think about the connections these people have with your topic. Who are the fans? Who are the skeptics? Who do you need the most on your side? Add them to the wall.

4

Now arrange these post-its into a map of the people involved in your challenge. Save it and refer to it as you move through your challenge.

 

Posted by J M in Phase 2 - Understand, 0 comments